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penguins

Penguins

Supraorbital gland

Penguins are animals that spend 75% of their lives in water. How do they cope with saltwater? Well, they have a special supraorbital gland under their eyes that filters the saltwater, and they excrete the byproducts through sneezing or through their beak. 1)

Staying warm

When weather conditions are not favorable, e.g. when it is snowing or it is very cold, penguins line up next to each other and turn their backs to the wind. They can spend in this position even several hours without eating. Sometimes (so that everyone is warmed up equally) they exchange places - those which were on the outside go inside, and those which were in the middle go outside. In addition, they are protected from losing heat by a thick layer of fat under the skin and a large number of feathers, which are arranged in a tiled close together. 2)

Great swimmers

Penguins are birds that cannot fly. In the past, however, they were able to do so, but because of the conditions in which they live, they have forgotten how to do it. They do not need it. Much more useful for them is the ability to swim, thanks to which they can hunt for fish. They can dive almost half a mile, and they can spend 25 minutes underwater. 3)

Not only black and white

The white and black coloration of the penguin is not accidental. The black color on their backs allows them to camouflage themselves better in the water. However, there are exceptions to every rule - one penguin in fifty thousand is born with brown coloration. A penguin with the brown coloration is not only worse off and an easier bite for lurking predators, but is also (usually) single and has trouble finding a mate 4)

Eating stones

Penguins are not able to bite the food, so they occasionally swallow a stone, which is transported to the stomach and crushed there. Such nutrition does not harm them. On the contrary, stones make the digestion process go faster, and with the extra weight in the stomach, they are able to dive much deeper. 5)

penguins.txt · Last modified: 2021/08/10 04:31 by aga